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2013 AM Education Course Description: MWF 105 - Metal Forming Fluids

December 01, 2012

Annual Meeting
STLE University

Education Course Fact Sheet: Metalworking 105 - Metal Forming Fluids

Course content, instructors and details subject to change. This listing was last updated on March 15, 2013.

Date/Time: Sunday, May 5, 2013, starting at 8:00 a.m. For details, see course agenda

Course Chair: Dr. Neil Canter, Chemical Solutions

Course Description: This course is designed for those involved in developing, working with and using metal forming fluids in the manufacturing environment. In particular, the metal forming course is very useful for formulators, technical service representatives, shop floor personnel and coolant service managers who all need to know more about the fundamental concepts of metal forming fluids. This course is divided into modules covering metal forming operations, metal forming fluid chemistry, metal forming fluid failure mechanisms, controlling contamination and microbial growth, waste treatment and operator acceptance. By the end of the course, participants will have gained a good understanding of metal forming operations, formulation of metal forming fluids, tools for identifying and correcting metal forming fluid failures and waste treatment of metal forming fluids. This course will also help students understand key building blocks that can be used in preparation for the STLE Certified Metalworking Fluids Specialist certification. This certification meets a growing need for a professional credential that demonstrates knowledge and competency in this fast-changing segment of the lubricants industry. 

You may also like: MWF 250 - Understanding and Controlling Metal Removal Fluid Failure, to be held on Wednesday.


COURSE MODULES

Introduction to Processes, Applications and Fluid/Lubrication Requirements

Overview: Key metal forming operations including forging, rolling, drawing and stamping are reviewed. The process of stamping is reviewed from the incoming steel to the outgoing part. All of the main types of stamping are covered in this module including hydroforming. The role of the lubricant is also discussed in this module.

Instructor: Rick Butler, Chemtool

Biography: Rick Butler earned a BS in Chemistry from Michigan State University. He has been employed in the industrial lubricants business for more than 30 years. Currently, he is Technical Manager for Metalworking at Chemtool Incorporated. He has worked primarily as a formulator of metalworking coolants and stamping lubricants throughout most of his career. Additional interests are rust preventative coatings, cleaners, gear oils, liquid gasket, die cast release agents, quenchants and bio-based lubricants. Previously, Rick worked as an analytical chemist for Fuchs Lubricants. Additionally, he held positions as a facility manager for North American Chemical Co in Dallas, Newridge chemical in Bedford Park, IL and Pillsbury Chemical and Oil in Detroit. Rick was chairperson of the STLE MWF Technical Section 2011-2012, Vice Chair of the Condition Monitoring Technical Section 2011-2012 and has given technical presentations at both local sections and the STLE Annual Meeting. He is a STLE CMFS.

Metal Forming Lubricant Chemistry Basics: Stamping and Blanking

Overview: This module covers the basic types of additives used in metalworking fluids with an emphasis on fluids for use in stamping and blanking. Representative formulations are provided and techniques discussed for applying them.

Instructor: Neil Canter, Chemical Solutions

Biography: Neil Canter received his PhD in Chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1983 and his BS in Chemistry in Brown University in 1978. He has been working in the metalworking fluid industry for over 25 years. Neil previously worked for Stepan Company and Mayco. Presently, Neil runs his own consulting company called Chemical Solutions. He specializes in commercial development, marketing , product development and regulatory support for the metalworking fluid industry. Neil is a member of the American Chemical Society, SAE and STLE. He is currently a contributing editor responsible for writing the monthly Tech Beat column in STLE's TLT magazine. Neil is also the Chairman of the STLE's Metalworking Fluid Steering Committee and is a member of the STLE Education Committee. Neil has been actively involved in making presentation at past STLE Annual and Local Section Meetings and Education Courses.

Metal Forming Lubricant Chemistry Basics: Rolling, Forging, Heading, and Wire Drawing

Overview: The function and types of additives used in rolling fluids are covered separately in this module. Criteria for evaluation of rolling lubricant performance and process factors affecting lubricant performance are also discussed. The types of lubricants used in forging, heading and wire drawing are described in the other segment of this module. 

Instructor: Ted McClure, TribSys

Biography: Ted McClure earned a BS in Chemistry from Miami University. Following graduate studies in organic chemistry, he has spent over 30 years developing, testing and servicing metalworking lubricants. Professional positions include Vice President, Technical for Franklin Oil and Cedar Lubricants and Director, Metal Forming Lubricant R&D for Fuchs Lubricants Co. He currently consults and markets metal forming lubricant testing services and equipment for TribSys. He served as a consultant and testing contractor for the Auto-Steel Partnership Tribology team, researching the tribology of advanced high strength steels, from 2001 - 2008.  He is current Treasurer of the North American Deep Drawing Research Group (NADDRG). He is Past -Chairman and current Education Co-Chair of the Chicago Section of the STLE. He authored the Metalforming chapter in the STLE Tribology Data Handbook, 2nd Edition. He is a Certified Metalworking Fluids Specialist (CFMS) and current vice-chair of the STLE MWF Certification subcommittee. He was formerly on the Editorial Advisory Board for Tribology and Lubrication Technology (TLT) magazine.

Metal Forming Failure Mechanisms: Lubrication, Concentration Control, Compatibility and Filtration

Overview: Failure mechanisms dealing with lubrication, concentration, compatibility and filtration will be discussed in this module. The compatibility section focuses on the problems that metal forming fluids face when placed in contact with conventional plastics such as high density polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride and with elastomers such as neoprene and paint.

Instructor: Neil Canter, Chemical Solutions

Biography: See above.

Metal Forming Fluid Failure Mechanisms: Water Quality, Corrosion, Foam, Emulsion Size, Residue and Cleanability

Overview: The impact that water quality, corrosion, residue, cleanability and emulsion droplet size have on the failure of metal forming fluids will be discussed in this module. Failure mechanisms and troubleshooting techniques will be detailed for these issues.

Instructor: Rick Butler, Chemtool

Biography: See above.

Controlling Contamination and Microbial Growth in Metal Forming Fluids

Overview: Strategies for controlling microbial contamination in metalworking fluid systems are discussed in this module. Included is a discussion of physical and chemical treatment options. A thorough review is made about how to use and assess the effectiveness of antimicrobial pesticides.

Instructor: Al Eachus

Biography: Dr. Alan C. Eachus, a retiree from  The Dow Chemical Company with 36 years of service, is currently an independent consultant and freelance technical writer. The majority of his professional career was spent at ANGUS Chemical Company and its corporate predecessors in technical-service positions, prior to its acquisition by Dow. He has more than thirty years of technical-support experience in nitroparaffin-related technology and antimicrobial -chemistry applications. He has spoken at technical-society meetings, conferences and symposia worldwide, and has authored or co-authored numerous publications in US, European and Asian technical and trade journals. He also retired as a Colonel, Ordinance Corps, from the US Army Reserve. Dr. Eachus earned a B.S. in chemistry from Syracuse University and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the State University of New York, College of Environmental Sciences and Forestry at Syracuse, and an M.B.A. in marketing and finance from Northwestern University in Chicago. His professional memberships include the American Chemical Society (Fifty-Year/ Emeritus Member), the Society for Industrial Microbiology (Emeritus Member), the American Society for Testing and Materials, the Society for Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (Life Member) and the New York Academy of Sciences. He is an adjunct instructor in the STLE Metalworking Fluids Certificate Course and is a CMFS. 

Waste Treatment of Metalworking Fluids

Overview: Each of the three techniques used to waste treat metalworking fluids will be reviewed in this module. These methods are evaporation, ultrafiltration and chemical treatment. Advantages and disadvantages for each technique are discussed. A performance comparison for the three methods is also included in this module.

Instructor: John Burke, Houghton International

Biography: John Burke is the Global Director of Engineering Services for Houghton International. He received his engineering degree from the University of Dayton in 1971. He has 40 years of experience in the metalworking industry and has five US patents. John has been an instructor for STLE's Metalworking Fluid Education Course for the past 20 years. John is a CMFS. John became a Fellow in the STLE in 2011. He received the P.M. Ku Award from STLE in 2006. John received an award from President George Bush at the White House in 1991 for advances in waste minimization.

Operator Acceptance and Final Q&A

Overview: Operator acceptance is a pivotal issue particularly in the replacement of metal forming fluids. Concepts will be introduced to discuss the reasons why obtaining operator acceptance is very difficult. This brief discussion will be followed by a final Q&A for the course.

Instructor: Neil Canter, Chemical Solutions

Biography: See above.


Course Agenda

8:00 AM Course Introduction
8:15 AM Introduction to Processes, Applications and Fluid/Lubrication Requirements
9:15 AM Metal Forming Lubricant Chemistry Basics: Stamping and Blanking
10:00 AM Break
10:15 AM Metal Forming Lubricant Chemistry Basics: Rolling, Forging, Heading, and Wire Drawing
11:15 AM Metal Forming Failure Mechanisms: Lubrication, Concentration Control, Compatibility and Filtration
12:15 PM Lunch
1:30 PM Metal Forming Fluid Failure Mechanisms: Water Quality, Corrosion, Foam, Emulsion Size, Residue and Cleanability
2:30 PM Controlling Contamination and Microbial Growth in Metal Forming Fluids
3:30 PM Break
3:45 PM Waste Treatment of Metalworking Fluids
4:30 PM Operator Acceptance and Final Q&A
5:00 PM Course Ends

 
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