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Annual Meeting Education Program

STLE 2014 Annual Meeting Education Program
Choose from 12 Industry-Specific Education Courses

The 2014 STLE Annual Meeting & Exhibition will feature twelve education courses offered on two days of the conference: Sunday, May 18th and Wednesday, May 21st, giving you more flexibility when planning your conference attendance. The course schedule includes three brand new courses, seven revised, updated and revamped signature courses like Basic Lubrication 101 and 102, as well as two collaborative courses – one with the American Bearing Manufacturers Association (ABMA) and the other with the National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI).

Also new this year is the ability to take an education course without attending the conference for a separate fee. Drive or fly, you can attend any one-day course and get back to work right away. To register for a course only, click here, or when you log in to your account, click "Register for Conferences" and then select "2014 Annual Meeting Single Day Registration." To register  

*Please note that course titles, content and instructors are subject to change.

If you have questions regarding these courses, please contact Kara Sniegowski, STLE’s Education Manager at
ksniegowski@stle.org, or Tom Heidrich, Education & Membership Services Specialist at theidrich@stle.org. Staff can also be reached at (847) 825-5536.

 
SUNDAY MAY 18th
Basic Lubrication 101: Fundamentals of Lubrication
Bearings and Their Lubrication (co-hosted with ABMA)
Condition Monitoring 301: 21st Century Condition Monitoring
Grease 101: Fundamentals of Grease (co-hosted by NLGI)
Hydraulics 102: Basic Hydraulic Components and Systems
MWF 125: Health, Safety, and an Introduction to GHS
Synthetics Lubricants 203: Non-Petroleum Fluids and Their Uses


WEDNESDAY MAY 21st
Advanced Lubrication 301
Basic Lubrication 102: Basic Applications
Gears 101: Fundamentals of Gears
MWF 130: Metal Treating, Cleaning & Protecting Fluids
Synthetic Lubricants 204: Fluid Formulation & Applications

Basic Lubrication 101: Fundamentals of Lubrication
Instructors
: Lawrence Wong, Chris Schmid, Dan Holdmeyer, Paul McGavin, Ray Thibault, and Ken Hope

Basic Lubrication 101 is an introduction to lubricants, lubrication principles, base oils, additives and compounded fluids. This course does not require the student to have a formal scientific degree or background, although many technical terms and concepts related to lubricants and their composition are covered. Basic Lubrication 101 is intended for a diverse group, including people involved in technical service, sales, marketing, manufacturing, maintenance and management who want to know more about lubricant products and how they work. Basic Lubrication 101 is designed specifically for those new to the lubrication industry. The course begins at 8:00 a.m. and concludes at 4:15 p.m, with lunch from 12-1 p.m., and breaks at 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Modules include: Base Oil Fundamentals, Additives, Lubrication Fundamentals, Fundamentals of Hydraulics, Lubricant Test Methods, and Synthetics. See details on each below.

Base Oil Fundamentals - taught by Lawrence Wong, Chevron (8:15-9:15 a.m.)

The presentation touches on the processing necessary to product base stocks from crude oil.  Base stock fundamentals and performance are also addressed.

With close to 15 years of experience in the petroleum industry, Lawrence has gained his lubricants  experience from working in various organizations ranging from from lube additives, to finished lubricants, to base oils in various roles including sales, marketing, research, laboratory and technical support.  He is currently a Product Development Engineer in Marketing & New Business Development with Chevron Base Oils, and is a graduate of the University of California, Davis, and is new to STLE, and a past member of the National Lubricating Grease Institue (NLGI).  He has experience and background within a variety of different product lines including, PCMO, HDMO, small engine oils, greases, aftermarket fuel additives, and base oils.

Additives - taught by Chris Schmid, Lubrizol Corporation (9:15-10:30 a.m.)

A review of the function of additives, the chemicals used in their formulations, and the mechanism of their action will be discussed.  The advantages and limitations of additives, together with examples of typical performance in laboratory test, and future trend of additives will also be discussed.

With 20 plus years' experience in the lubrication industry, Chris built his real-world lubrication knowledge managing field tests for Lubrizol and its customers and managing customer programs in Lubrizol's engine oil group. He has been responsible for field testing in all of the major lubricant market segments and in numerous regions around the world.  By virtue of his work with dealerships, fleet maintenance managers, OEM representatives and lubricant marketers, Chris has unique insights into the knowledge and skills required of lubricant consumers and sales forces.  Chris is now the Regional Business Manager for Lubrizol Custom Solutions. He has developed and taught courses on basic and advanced lubrication, equipment design and operation, and trouble-shooting techniques.  Chris has a mechanical engineering degree from Carnegie-Mellon University and masters of business administration from John Carroll University.  Chris is also an STLE Certified Lubrication Specialist.

Lubrication Fundamentals - taught by Dan Holdmeyer, Chevron (10:45-11:45 a.m.)

Fundamentals of Lubrication will discuss the basics of friction, wear, and lubrication - and how they are related.  We will cover the regimes of lubrication and the basic selection criteria when applying lubricants to different machinery components.  You will also learn about typical lubricant composition and how it varies by application.  At the end of this section you will understand the fundamental principles of lubrication at a basic level.

Mr. Holdmeyer received his Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Missouri-Columbia.  He is currently a member of the Cleveland Section of STLE, and is STLE CLS and OMA I Certified.  Dan is a Past-Chair for the STLE OMA Committee and the Co-Chair for Basic Lubrication Course at the STLE National Meeting.  He is currently a Field Trainer at Chevron Lubricants.  Dan has also worked as a Field Sales Engineer, Field Lubrication Program Engineer, National Account Manager, Global Account Manager, and OEM Service Engineer during his 34 year career, working with a myriad of different industries, such as Automotive, Heavy Duty Engine On-Highway, Off-Highway Quarry & Mining, Agriculture, Power Generation, Primary Metal, Pulp & Paper, Glass, Metalworking, and General Manufacturing.
As a Field Trainer, Dan works with these industries in lubrication engineering with the end-user customers and Chevron Sales in educating, on industry trends, product application, best-practice lubrication programs, and troubleshooting analysis of lubrication issues.

Fundamentals of Hydraulics - taught by Paul McGavin, Eaton Corporation (1-2 p.m.)

Hydraulic systems are found in almost every type of machinery, in almost every industry.  Whether involved in designing, selling, or servicing hydraulic oils and other lubricants, it is important to understand the fundamentals of hydraulics. The course covers the principles of hydraulic theory and the operating characteristics of the basic hydraulic components that are used to create a complete system. Topics include pumps, actuators, directional controls, flow controls, pressure controls, reservoirs, accumulators and filters.

Paul McGavin is a Senior Training Specialist, and currently a member of the Eaton Hydraulics Training Services Group in Maumee, Ohio where he has been since 2007. Previous work history includes Manufacturing, Product and Applications Engineering as well as Sales and Product Manager positions. Primary employment history Eaton Corporation, Saint Gobain Corporation and Furon Company.Paul holds a BSME from The University of Michigan, an MBA from The University of Dayton and is a Certified IFPS Instructor.

Lubricant Testing Methods - taught by Ray Thibault, LTC (2-3 p.m.)

This presentation investigates the relationship of Lubricant QA/QC and Qualification tests, as detailed on lubricant suppliers product data sheets against physical lubricant performance.  This presentation will provide an overview of lubricants testing, results interpretation, and the relationship to performance in application.   Many of the tests are specific to the different industrial lubricant classes such as turbine, gear, and hydraulic oils along with greases.  Over twenty different tests will be examined with particular emphasis on testing procedures, result interpretation, and relevance to field application. Product data sheets from various lubricant suppliers will be used as illustrations.

Ray Thibault, CLS, OMA I & II MLT I & II and MLA II & III retired from ExxonMobil with 31 years of service in 2001 to form LTC, a lubrication training & consulting company.  He has done extensive training and consulting worldwide for many of the leading manufacturing and lubricant companies. As a contributing editor for Lubrication Management & Technology magazine for the past six years, he writes bimonthly articles on lubrication.  He has been the session chairman for Lubricants World held at the International Maintenance and Predictive Maintenance Conferences and is an active speaker at many other conferences such as STLE, Predictive Maintenance, and MARTS. He has worked with local STLE chapters such as Oklahoma, Houston, and Chicago as a presenter at their lube schools. He currently resides in Cypress, Texas.

Synthetics - taught by Ken Hope, Chevron Phillips Chemical (3:15-4:15 p.m.)

This presentation will provide a general overview of synthetic lubricants, touching on both composition and function.  Where appropriate, performance comparisons with conventional lubricants will be presented.

Ken Hope graduated with a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1988. Ken has over 20 years of experience in the lubricant industry.  His research interests have been primarily focused in the area of polyalphaolefins and the use of synthetic lubricants.  He is a research fellow and team leader for NAO/PAO Technology at Chevron Phillips Chemical Co. LP. in Houston.  He is a member of the STLE Board of Directors, serves on the Finance Committee and chairs the Editorial and Publications Committee. 

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Bearings and Their Lubrication (co-hosted by ABMA)
Instructors: Les Miller, Jim Oliver, Joerg Binderszewsky, Paul Conley, Piet Lugt, and Roman Wajda

STLE, in cooperation with ABMA, is offering this course on rolling element bearings for those involved in industrial equipment design, reliability, and maintenance. It will include a basic overview of bearings, their selection, precision and mounting considerations, and lubrication related influences. A hands-on failure analysis session will be included. The course begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m, with lunch from 12-1 p.m., and breaks taken as needed around 10:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.

Modules include: Bearing Types, Characteristics and Tolerances, Basic Rating Life of Bearings, Bearing Design for Dynamic Operating Conditions, Emerging Lubricating Trends in Steel Mill and Paper Mill Applications, Lubrication Influence on Bearing Operating Characteristics, Bearings and Lubrication in Fan/Blower Applications, and Bearing Failures (hands-on). See details on each below.

Bearing Types, Characteristics and Tolerances - taught by Les Miller, Kaydon Bearings (8:15-9:15 a.m.)

This module will describe the typical bearings used in industrial applications, basic designs, components, characteristics, tolerances, benefits and example applications.

Les Miller is currently the V. P. of Engineering at Kaydon Bearings and has responsibility for the design, development and application of all products.  Les has been active in the bearing industry for 36 years and received his BSME from Tri-State College.  He has been active in the ABMA Engineering Education Committee and Bearing Technical Committee for the past 15 years.  He has also been a member of the ASME Tribology Division and is a long time member of STLE.  His work history includes 26 years with NSK and a total of 9 years with Kaydon in ever increasing levels of responsibility for Product Design and Application Engineering.

Basic Rating Life of Bearings - taught by Jim Oliver, SKF (9:15-10:15 a.m.)

In this module, we will cover load ratings and life calculations based on ISO 281: 2007, and environmental influences.

Jim Oliver obtained his BSME from Lafayette College in May 1985 and began his career with SKF immediately afterwards.  He spent 4 years in Application Engineering, 4 years as a Metals Industry Specialist and 2 years as Service Manger in the Southeast U.S.  In 2001, Jim relocated to the USA corporate office in Kulpsville, PA as Engineering Manager of Application Engineering for the Industrial Division of SKF USA.  He spent 12 years as an engineering manager working with major OEMS producing pumps, fans, compressors, electric motors, medical procedure chairs and tables, X-ray tubes, and postal sorting machines. Most recently, Jim accepted the position as Director of Application Engineering and Industry Specialists in February 2012 and continues in this role today.  Part of this role is the SKF USA representative to ABMA, and support of STLE, AIST, SME, and other technical societies.

Bearing Design for Dynamic Operating Conditions - taught by Joerg Binderszewsky, Schaeffler Technologies AG & Co. KG (10:15-11:15 a.m.)

This module will cover bearing design including: static vs. dynamic bearing simulation, multibody system simulation vs. multibody bearing simulation, possible applications for dynamic bearing simulation with examples, smearing/adhesive wear, and cage analysis. 

Jeorg Binderszewsky has been a member of the Rolling Bearing Fundamentals group at Schaeffler since graduating University in 1991.  He received his Diploma in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Hannover located in Hannover, Germany.  Jeorg has primarily focused his efforts in analyzing the strength of bearing components and is now more specifically directed toward the analysis and design of bearing cages.

Emerging Lubricating Trends in Steel Mill and Paper Mill Applications - taught by Paul Conley, SKF (11:15-12 p.m.)

This presentation discusses some new technology in lubrication delivery systems for rolling element bearings.  Also presented is recent work in systems for steel mills and pulp & paper mills.

Paul Conley has been the Chief Engineer of Research and Product Development for Lincoln Industrial since 1997. He holds BS in Aeronautical Engineering at St. Louis University and MS in Engineering Management at the University of Missouri Science and Technology. Paul is a registered professional engineer in the state of Missouri. He is a member of STLE and NLGI and has co authored papers on topics related to grease rheology. Paul has written two chapters in the second edition of the STLE Handbook of Lubrication and Tribology. Paul is the holder of 15 patents and has currently 20 pending.

Lubrication Influence on Bearing Operating Characteristics - taught by Piet Lugt, SKF (1-3 p.m.)

In this module, we’ll cover general characteristics such as friction/efficiency, noise, operating temperature, and lubricant life; and we’ll also go into application-specific characteristics related to environment, seal compatibility, ambient environment, reliability, extreme operating limits, and additive effects (several current key application areas such as wind power will be discussed).

Dr. Piet M. Lugt is a senior research engineer at SKF Engineering & Research Centre located in the Netherlands.  He has been at SKF for 16 years and during that time has held various positions including team leader “Lubrication”, team leader “Tribology Research” and portfolio manager “Tribology and Lubrication”. He has been a visiting professor at Luleå Technical University, Sweden and an assistant professor at Delft University. He has (co)authored more than 50 papers and patents and is an associate editor with "STLE Tribology Transactions".  Dr Lugt has a MSc. and PhD. in Tribology from the University of Twente, The Netherlands (1988, 1992).

Bearings and Lubrication in Fan/Blower Applications - taught by Roman Wajda Baldor-Dodge Bearings (3-3:45 p.m.)

We'll cover the basic lubrication requirements and recommendations for bearings in fan/blower applications.

Mr. Wajda has over 30 years of design and application experience within industrial applications utilizing anti-friction bearings. He is the holder of three patents and has published several Industry / Technical articles on bearing application and design. He has held numerous positions within research and development, application and presently holds the position of Industry Business Manager - Air-Unit handling. 

Bearing Failures - taught by Roman Wajda, Baldor-Dodge Bearings (3:45-4:45 p.m.)

This will be a brief presentation on the common failure modes (with pictures), followed by hands-on analysis of actual failed bearings.

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Condition Monitoring 301: 21st Century Condition Monitoring
Instructors: Evan Zabawski, Chad Chichester, Allison Toms and Jack Poley

This course is targeted to advanced experience levels. It is expected the attendee has very good-to-strong familiarity with the role of condition monitoring in modern maintenance schema, particularly oil analysis. It is designed for those routinely involved in condition monitoring. Emphasis is on current techniques and practices, including new tests, new instrumentation, new concepts, increasing use of software and modern data evaluation strategies, taught by practicing experts. The course begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m, with lunch from 12-1:15 p.m., and breaks at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Modules include: Advanced Data Interpretation: Mining Data for Trends, Patterns and Proper Alarms; Condition Monitoring (CM) Techniques Complementary to Oil Analysis; Impact of Machinery Configuration and Operations on Monitoring Techniques and Data Interpretation; and Changing Paradigms in CM: Online Oil Analysis, Extended Particle Analysis, Software and More.

Advanced Data Interpretation: Mining Data for Trends, Patterns and Proper Alarms - taught by Evan Zabawski, FluidLife (8:15-10 a.m.)

This module provides an overview as to extracting the most from your oil analysis program data. The User is encouraged to become familiar with the manner in which data are evaluated. There are numbers of ways to view and analyze data. A variety of approaches is discussed and assessed. Limits, alarm settings and trending of data are explored in several contexts.

Evan is a Certified Lubrication Specialist with diplomas in chemical engineering technology (CET, ASET) and 4th class power engineering. Evan has extensive experience training tradesmen and professionals in a variety of fields. He has been a member of STLE for over 14 years, serving as Chair of the Alberta Section for 8 years. Evan is also Editor of TLT Magazine, has served as the Editor for The STLE Alberta Section’s Basic Handbook of Lubrication and has contributed as one of the editors for STLE/CRC’s Handbook of Lubrication and Tribology. He has published several technical papers and is also a member of API and ASTM.

Condition Monitoring (CM) Techniques Complementary to Oil Analysis - taught by Chad Chichester, Dow Corning Corporation (10:15-12 p.m.)

CM has numbers of disciplines that tend to fall into the category of NDT (Non-Destructive Testing). In this module Vibration and Thermography are explored. Vibration enjoys, along with Oil Analysis, a huge role in equipment health monitoring. Thermography is an ancillary NDT that can help isolate specific trouble spots in support of Vibration and Oil Analysis. The module wraps up with CBM (Condition Based Maintenance) concepts and examples.

Chad Chichester is employed by Dow Corning Corporation currently in Application Engineering and Technical Service.  Prior to his current role Chad spent 13 years in maintenance and reliability engineering in Dow Corning’s Midland, MI manufacturing facility specializing in Condition Based Maintenance techniques including Vibration Analysis, Infrared Thermography, In-Service Fluid Analysis, and Ultrasonic Analysis.  Before joining Dow Corning Chad served in the U.S. Army as a Test Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment Specialist.  Chad majored in mechanical engineering at Saginaw Valley State University. Chad is certified by the National Vibration Institute as a Category III Vibration Analyst.  He is also certified in Infrared Thermography, and is a Certified Lubrication Specialist.

Impact of Machinery Configuration and Operations on Monitoring Techniques and Data Interpretation - taught by Allison Toms, GasTOPS, Inc. (1:15-3 p.m.)

Oil Analysis has been around for decades. Many current practices are 20 years old or more. Machinery and lubricant OEMs and government research have invested in improvements in both the design and materials used in manufacturing and production as well as in lubricant formulation. Many of these improvements have not been adequately reflected in current testing practices. Testing equipment and methodologies have also improved and new monitoring tools have been introduced to address new problems. Data analysis, too, has become more sophisticated as have the data. This module discusses the impact of newer technology and thinking used to address and integrate increasingly more complex components, lubricants and utilization.

Ms. Allison Toms is Vice President of Technology and Engineering Services for GasTOPS Inc., a company that provides technical solutions for machinery condition assessment through advanced fluid measurement and analysis technology and services.  From 2004 to Sep 2013, Allison served as the Technical Director for GasTOPS Inc. In this capacity, Allison developed analytical techniques and condition indicators for new products and applications; and performed analytics on machinery lubricant and wear condition.  Prior to joining GasTOPS, Allison was Chief Chemist and Physical Science Dept Head for the US Military Joint Oil Analysis Program Technical Support Center (JOAP-TSC) with over 360 laboratories from 22 countries in the Joint Program. While at the JOAP-TSC, she pioneered FT-IR for in-service oil analysis and her analytics work represents a milestone in condition monitoring. Allison has authored more than 50 papers and training manuals, written chapters in four industry handbooks on lubricant properties & test methods, fluid maintenance and oil condition monitoring and is the co-author of “Machinery Oil Analysis - Methods, Automation & Benefits”, 3rd Edition, STLE, Park Ridge, IL, 2008.

Changing Paradigms in CM: Online Oil Analysis, Extended Particle Analysis, Software and More - taught by Jack Poley, Condition Monitoring International (CMI) (3:15-5 p.m.)

The first decade of the 21st century has seen an enormous amount of gains in insights and technology. Oil analysis is entering new areas, the most exciting of which, perhaps, is online wear particle monitoring; but there are other advancements, too, including a greater awareness of the usefulness/importance of identifying all particle sizes and their composition, e.g., filter debris analysis. Intelligent Agents (smart Expert Systems) are available that can greatly improve the data evaluation exercise to approach maximum savings and asset uptime. This module addresses some of the new arrivals and thinking on the analytical scene and their impact on oil analysis and condition monitoring protocols, as well as the increasing sophistication available in presenting informative evaluation commentary.

Jack has a B.S., Chemistry and B.S., Management from University of California [Berkeley] and New York University School of Commerce, respectively, and is in his 53d year in Condition Monitoring and Oil Analysis. He was former managing vice president of Staveley Services Laboratories (now ALS). A member of STLE for 45 years, Jack co-founded the Condition Monitoring Technical Committee and founded the Condition Monitoring Education Course. He is an STLE Fellow. Jack also co-founded STLE’s successful Oil Monitoring Analyst (OMA) Program. Jack authors chapters for various publications, as well as a bi-monthly column, On Condition Monitoring, for STLE’s Tribology and Lubrication Transactions magazine. He has presented numerous papers and over 100 seminars worldwide on condition monitoring. Jack is managing general partner of Condition Monitoring International, LLC (CMI), a company specializing in helping others implement condition monitoring (CM) programs, including the use of an intelligent agent, Prescient, which Jack designed for auto-evaluation of in-service fluid analysis (ISFA) data , as well as other CM test data, including real-time sensor output.

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Grease 101: Fundamentals of Grease (co-hosted with NLGI)
Instructors: Chuck Coe, Valentina Serra-Holm, David Turner, Jaime Spagnoli, Paul Shiller, Chad Chichester, Gareth Fish, and Alan Denniston

This course is a comprehensive overview of all aspects of lubricating grease. Grease formulation components are thoroughly covered, including base oils and the many different thickener types. Manufacturing technologies are reviewed, as well as grease testing significance and methods. Included is a good discussion detailing how to select the proper grease for different applications, and a variety of examples of both industrial and automotive applications are discussed. The course begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m, with lunch from 12-1 p.m., and breaks at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Modules include: Introduction to Greases, Base Oils, Grease Manufacturing Overview & Open Kettle Manufacture, Grease Manufacturing Contactor/Kettle & Continuous Manufacture, Grease Testing, Grease Selection, Industrial Applications, Automotive Applications, and Application Problem Solving.

Introduction to Greases - taught by Chuck Coe, Grease Technology Solutions, LLC (8-8:30 a.m.)

This introductory module will discuss the definition, history, purpose and composition of grease. It will answer the questions: What is grease and what is grease used for? It will also provide a brief history of grease and an overview of the components of grease including base oils, thickeners and additives.

Chuck Coe holds a BS Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University. In 1977, he joined Mobil Oil (subsequently ExxonMobil), where he worked for 32 years, including 22 years in various lubes and fuels technical positions, of which 12 years were spent formulating and providing technical support for greases, including 6 years as ExxonMobil’s Grease Technology Manager.  He retired from ExxonMobil and launched Grease Technology Solutions LLC, a grease training and consulting business in October, 2009.  He is a Member of and Education Course Committee Chair for STLE and is the President of NLGI.  He has authored 2 technical papers and several articles on grease. He received Best Marketing Paper and Best Paper awards from both NLGI and ELGI, and the John A. Bellanti Meritorious Service Award from NLGI in 2012. He holds the professional certifications of NLGI C.L.G.S. and STLE C.L.S.

Base Oils - taught by Valentina Serra-Holm, Nynas AB (8:30-9:15 a.m.)

The module provides an overview of the impact of base fluids on grease properties. The module covers the main base fluids used in the manufacturing of greases, their production processes and the link between their chemical composition and properties.

Valentina Serra-Holm holds a Ph D in Chemical Reaction Engineering from Abo Akademi, Finland, 2000 and a PhD in Chemical Plants from Polytechnic of Turin, Italy, 1997. After ten years of academic work, Valentina joined Nynas AB in 2001, where she is held several technical positions in the base oils segment before moving to Marketing in 2008. She is currently the Global Marketing Director at Nynas. Valentina’s main expertises are refining and base oil production with particular reference to naphthenic base oils.

Grease Manufacturing Overview & Open Kettle Manufacture - taught by David Turner, Shell Global Solutions (9:15-10 a.m.)

The first module will provide a brief overview of grease manufacturing, covering the different manufacturing approaches for each thickener type, and setting the stage for the more in-depth discussions in this module and the second manufacturing module on open kettle, contactor-kettle and continuous manufacturing methods. In the second module, an in-depth discussion of the process and equipment utilized in the open-kettle manufacture of greases is presented.

David Turner is a Global Technical Services Advisor at the Shell Technology Center Houston in Houston, Texas. David is a graduate of Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, holding a BS degree in Chemical Engineering. He has more than 32 years of experience in the lubricants industry, primarily in grease formulation, manufacturing, and technical service. He is a member of STLE and ASTM, and has authored several papers for NLGI. He is the chairman of ASTM D02.G on Lubricating Grease and is co-chair of the NLGI Technical Committee. He is the recipient of the NLGI Clarence E. Earl Memorial Award, the ASTM Award of Excellence, the NLGI Meritorious Service Award, the NLGI Fellows Award, the NLGI Chevron Lubricants Award, and the NLGI Shell Lubricants Award for Instructor Excellence. He is an NLGI Certified Lubricating Grease Specialist (CLGS), an STLE Oil Monitoring Analyst (OMA I), and an STLE Certified Lubrication Specialist (CLS).

Grease Manufacturing Contactor/Kettle & Continuous Manufacture - taught by David Turner, Shell Global Solutions (10:30-11 a.m.)

Presentation will include an overview of utilizing the STRATCO Contactor reactor in manufacturing lubricating greases, including brief history, advantages and basic comparison with conventional kettle and continuous methods of production. The second part of this module will provide an in-depth discussion of the process and equipment utilized in continuous grease manufacturing.

Grease Testing - taught by Jaime Spagnoli, ExxonMobil Research & Engineering (11-12 p.m.)

This module provides a brief description of the key bench and rig tests used by the grease industry to test grease.  The training also includes reference to multi-purpose grease and the tests used to measure the various properties (eg. corrosion protection) of a multi-purpose grease.

Jaime received a BS in Engineering Technology from Trenton State College, New Jersey.  He has worked 37 years at ExxonMobil in lubricant research and development and has over 20 years experience in grease R&D.  He is currently working as a Senior Researcher in the Grease Group at ExxonMobil Research and Engineering.  He is an active participant in ASTM, STLE, NLGI and ELGI activities and is past Chairman of ASTM Sub Committee G.  Jaime is NLGI CLGS certified.

Grease Selection - taught by Paul Shiller, University of Akron (1-2 p.m.)

Due to their availability and ease of installation and maintenance, ball or roller bearings are widely used in a broad variety of machines and equipment. Consequently, design and maintenance personnel, as well as lubricant suppliers, are often confronted with need for some knowledge of their theory and application. Accordingly, this presentation will review the basics of grease selection from a basic evaluation to determine the best choice in viscosity and thickener to other application considerations that need to be addressed.  This presentation will cover: causes of bearing failure, choosing oil or grease, choosing a base oil viscosity, choosing a base oil, choosing a thickener, and other application considerations.

Paul Shiller received a Ph.D. degree in Physical Chemistry from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH studying the surface reactions at fuel cell electrodes using molecular orbital methods.  He holds an M.S degree in Chemical Engineering also from Case Western Reserve University where he studied the characteristics of “Diamond-like films”.  He received a BE degree in Chemical Engineering from Youngstown State University.  He recently moved to the University of Akron as a Research Scientist in an “Open Innovation” collaborative effort between The University of Akron and The Timken Co.  At The University of Akron he will be working in the Timken Engineered Surfaces lab, which is part of the Center for Surface Engineering and Lubrication Research.  In this position he will carry out fundamental studies of lubrication additives and lubrication mechanisms with an emphasis on modeling and high-pressure properties.  Previously he worked at The Timken Company as a Product Development Specialist for lubricants and lubrication in starting in 2004.  He then moved to a position as a Tribological Specialist within the Tribology and Next Generation Materials group at the Timken Technology Center in North Canton.  At Timken he studies how the chemistry of lubricants affects bearings especially how additives can be used to extend bearing life.  Before coming to Timken he managed a polymer analytical chemistry lab at the Packard Electric division of DELPHI.  He started at Packard Electric as a quality control engineer in the ignition cable department when Packard Electric was a division of General Motors.  He was a Process Engineer on the thin film deposition processes for liquid crystal display products at PanelVision in Pittsburgh.  Paul worked as a Research Engineer at The General Tire Company in Akron studying polymer extrusion and molding and the performance of tennis balls.  He started his lubrication career as a Summer Intern at The Penn State University. Paul has received a Professional Promise Award from AIChE and the Shell Lubricants award for Instructor Excellence from NLGI. He is also currently an Adjunct Professor of Chemistry at Kent State University.  Paul is a member of STLE, ACS, and SOR.

Industrial Applications - taught by Chad Chichester, Dow Corning Corporation (2-3 p.m.)

The Industrial Applications module builds on grease fundamentals to emphasize general considerations for many industrial segment applications.  Industrial segments covered include; General Manufacturing, Steel, Mining, Paper Processing, Chemical Processing, Heavy Construction and Agriculture, Railroad, Textile, and Metal Processing."

Chad has worked as a Lubricants Application Engineering for Dow Corning Corporation, Since 2006.  Prior, he worked for 13 years as a Reliability Engineer at Dow Corning’s Midland, MI manufacturing site where he specialized in Condition Based Maintenance techniques including Vibration, Lubrication, and Acoustic Emission Analyses, as well as Infrared Thermography.  Before joining Dow Corning Chad served in the U.S. Army as a Test Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment Specialist. Chad is a Mechanical/Electrical Engineer from Saginaw Valley State University.  Chad is a member of: National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI) where he serves as the Application and Maintenance Training Course Chair and, and instructs in the NLGI Maintenance Course, Basic Grease Course, and the Advanced Grease Course. Chad is als a member of the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE), where he serves as an instructor in the Condition Monitoring Course.  Chad is certified through STLE as a Certified Lubrication Specialist (CLS). National Vibration Institute where he certified as a Level III Vibration Analyst.

Automotive Applications - taught by Gareth Fish, Lubrizol (3:30-4:30 p.m.)

The Automotive Applications module builds on grease fundamentals to emphasize general considerations for many automotive greases. It covers both the major and minor greases used on todays passenger cars and light trucks. It also covers heavy duty applications such as on commercial trucks and buses. It also outlines the requirements and approval of NLGI Automotive Service Greases. Trends for future applications are also outlined.

Dr Gareth Fish obtained his B.Sc. (Honours) in Chemistry 1984 from Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London and a Ph.D. in Tribology 1990 also from Imperial College, under the supervision of Professor Hugh Spikes.  In 1988, he joined the UK Ministry of Defence, Fuels and Lubricants Branch, at the Royal Arsenal Woolwich, in the Mechanical Testing of Lubricants Laboratory.  In September 1990, he was appointed Senior, then Principal Tribologist at GKN Technology Ltd, Wolverhampton, England. In 1999 he became Global Technical Coordinator for Tribology and Grease. In 2002 he relocated to GKN Automotive, Inc, Auburn Hills, Michigan.  In June 2007, he joined The Lubrizol Corporation, Wickliffe, Ohio, as Technology Manager for Grease.  In 2010 he was promoted to Technical Fellow  and is now the Strategic Technoology Manager for Industrial Additives. He is a Chartered Scientist (CSci) and Chartered Chemist (CChem), a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC), and the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE) and the Energy Institute (MEI).  He is chair of ASTM D02 B04 Automotive Greases and D02 G07 Grease Research Techniques. He is both an STLE Certified Lubrication Specialist (CLS) and an NLGI Certified Lubricating Grease Specialist (CLGS).  He has authored 35 technical papers on tribology and grease, and holds three patents.  In 2000 received the Chevron Products Award of the NLGI for the 1999 technical paper “Constant Velocity Joint Greases”,  in 2002 received the NLGI Fellows Award, and in 2010 & 2012 receieved the Clarence E. Earle Memorial Award from the NLGI for, in 2011 the NGL authors award and in 2013 the SOPUS prize for teaching excellence at the NLGI annual meeting.

Application Problem Solving - taught by Alan Denniston, Total Lubricants USA (4:30-5 p.m.)

Problem solving is a practical discussion of the most common issues end-users will encounter with grease such as: grease softening, dispensibility, compatibiliity, over greasing and contamination.  Dr. Alan Denniston received his PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Washington.  He has over 30 years experience with lubricants.

Dr. Alan Denniston received his PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Washington.  He has over 30 years experience with lubricants

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Hydraulics 102: Basic Hydraulic Components and Systems
Instructors: Nathan Knotts, Paul McGavin, Steve Paulin, and Mark Floer

This course will provide an overview of the basic mechanical components used in hydraulic in fluid power transmission. In particular, you will learn about how typical components operate and equally important how they interact. Additionally, the course will cover failure modes and troubleshooting methods. This course series is the definitive STLE education course for anyone who uses or maintains fluid power equipment in their operations, and for anyone who provides sales and/or technical service to those who use hydraulic fluids and hydraulic equipment. The course begins at 8:00 a.m. and concludes at 4:15 p.m, with lunch from 12-1 p.m., and breaks at 10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. There is also an optional tour (2-2.5 hours) that will view and discuss a hydraulically-driven ride in Disney's park. It will take place on Tuesday, May 20, 2014. More information coming soon!

Modules include: Hydraulic Fluid Overview, Hydraulic Components (Reservoirs, Pumps, Controls (including flow, pressure, and directional), Actuators, Motors and Accumulators), Control System Design & Operation - Mobile Equipment, and a special guest speaker from Disney Imagengineering on Design and Operation of Attractions.

Hydraulic Fluid Overview - taught by Nathan Knotts, Chevron (8:10-9:10 a.m.)

Review of hydraulic fluid composition from importance of base oil performance and its impacts on the areas of high and low temperature viscosity, oxidation, aeration, seal swell, volatility, and fire resistance. Focus on the various additive types commonly used in formulating conventional hydraulic fluids.  Attention will be given to their chemistry, treat rates and mechanisms of action. Basic review of typical performance tests used to evaluate hydraulic fluids.  Talking about the testing criteria, which property the test is evaluating and things to look out for during testing and when selecting a proper fluid. 

Nathan Knotts is currently Lead Research Scientist for Chevron Products Company. He received his B.S. degree in Chemistry from Adams State College and Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He has been with Chevron for 6 years and Nathan’s main role in the company is as a product developer with responsibilities in handling hydraulic fluids, rock drill, and AW circulating oil products globally. Nathan is a participating member of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and is the current Chair for D.02 Section N Hydraulics, and Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE).

Hydraulic Components (Reservoirs, Pumps, Controls (including flow, pressure, and directional), Actuators, Motors and Accumulators) - taught by Paul McGavin, Eaton Corporation (9:10-10, and 10:15-12 p.m.)

In this portion of Hydraulics 102 the attendee is introduced to the basic components found in a hydraulic system.  From the reservoir to the actuator you will learn the component name, use, key characteristics, how it functions and the basic schematic symbols used to represent each along the way.  A great preparation for follow up classes which examine how these components work in concert to form hydraulic systems.  This section will also go into the details of the components responsible for controlling flow, pressure and directional. Reviewing aspects of how the component work, the different varieties, and pros and cons of each type.  Troubleshooting or maintenace of the components.

Currently a member of the Eaton Hydraulics Training Services Group in Maumee, Ohio where he has been since 2007. Previous work history includes Manufacturing, Product and Applications Engineering as well as Sales and Product Manager positions. Primary employment history Eaton Corporation, Saint Gobain Corporation and Furon Company. Paul holds a BSME from The University of Michigan, an MBA from The University of Dayton and is a Certified IFPS Instructor.

Control System Design & Operation - Mobile Equipment - taught by Steve Paulin, Eaton Corporation (1-2:30 p.m.)

This portion of Hydraulics 102 expands the study of hydraulic components into hydraulic systems.  You will learn how components such as pumps and valves are applied, and how they function together in sub-systems like propel or steering.  Finally, you’ll see a whole machine schematic “come to life” as all the parts are assembled into a typical mobile machine circuit using a dynamic simulation tool that displays fluid pressures and flows while operating various parts of the machine. 

Steve studied Mechanical Engineering at Wichita State University, and graduated in 1974.  He worked as an Engineer, designing construction and farm equipment, then started with Vickers Hydraulics in 1982.  After holding several positions in sales and sales management, Steve joined Vickers’ newly-formed application engineering team in 1997.  When Eaton bought Vickers in 1999, the Applications  team continued, and it still plays a vital role within Eaton Hydraulics today.   Steve specializes in mobile equipment, and currently supports Eaton sales to major OEM’s like John Deere and Case New Holland. 

Disney Imagengineering Design and Operation of Attractions - taught by Mark Floer, Walt Disney World Design & Engineering (2:45-4:45 p.m.)

Now that you have learned more about hydraulic components, let’s put them to work.  Have you ever wondered how Disney does it?  In this segment, Mark will start by providing you an overview of the Disney World operations, maintenance, and design of some of the world class Disney World attractions.  Mark will focus on the design, operation, maintenance and troubleshooting of some of the attractions at Disney World.  This will be an interesting real life discussion about how hydraulic equipment is applied to the attractions enjoyed by people of all ages.  

Speaker biography coming soon.

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Metalworking Fluids 125: Health, Safety, and an Introduction to GHS
Instructors: Fred Passman, Mick Wragg, Neil Canter, and John Howell

This course will provide participants with an understanding of the fundamentals of the primary health and safety issues with which fluid managers, machine operators, shop stewards and managers must be familiar in order to provide workers with a safe work environment. The first half of the program covers these issues from industrial hygiene, toxicology and microbial health risk perspectives. The second half of the program focuses on recently implemented global harmonized standards (GHS) – particularly on changes to the 2012 revision to OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS - 29CFR1910.1200). Course participants will receive an overview of GHS and more detailed explanations of several key elements of HCS: Safety Data Sheet (SDS – replacing the familiar MSDS) formatting and information requirements, classification of chemical mixture risks, and interpretation of the new GHS pictograms. The course begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5:15 p.m, with lunch from 12-1 p.m., and breaks at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Modules include: Introduction to Industrial Hygiene, Introduction to MWF Toxicology, Mist, Health Effects of MWF Microbes, GHS Overview: What's Changed?, SDS Overview: Appendix D, Label and SDS Pictograms: What Should My Customers Expect to See?, and Classification of Mixtures.

Introduction to Industrial Hygiene - taught by Fred Passman, BCA, Inc. (8:15-9:15 a.m.)

This module will discuss the partnership between the fluid manager and industrial hygienist.  It will address industrial hygiene issues affected by the selection, application and condition management of water-miscible metalworking fluids.

Dr. Frederick J. Passman, PhD, CFMS, FASTM FSTLE, Course Chair. Dr. Passman is an ASTM Fellow, STLE Fellow and Certified Metalworking Fluids Specialist with 40 years’ experience in environmental-industrial microbiology.  Dr. Passman is a member of numerous professional societies.  Within STLE, he has served as Associate Editor for Tribology and Lubrication Technology, Chair, STLE Education Course Committee; Chair, STLE Education Committee; Chair, Metalworking Fluid Management Education and Training Subcommittee; Chair, Certified Metalworking Fluid Specialist Certification Steering Committee; Chair, STEL Certification Board and Chair, STLE Executive Committee for Harmonization of Education and Certification. Dr. Passman is the Vice-chair of ATSM Subcommittee D.02.14 on Fuel Cleanliness and Stability.  He chairs ASTM Subcommittee D.02.14 Task Force on Fuel Microbiology, is Vice-chair, ASTM Committee E.34 Industrial Health & Safety; Chair, Subcommittee E.34.50 Health and Safety of Metalworking Fluids and is an active member of E.35.15 Antimicrobial Pesticides. He has drafted ASTM Standards for each of these committees.  Dr. Passman has twice received STLE’s Wilber Deutsch Memorial Award for writing excellence.  He has more than 40 publications to his name.

Introduction to MWF Toxicology - taught by Mick Wragg, The Lubrizol Corporation (9:15-10 a.m.)

This presentation will review the critical aspects of MWF toxicology and risk assessment that are critical for MWF managers to understand. 

Mr. Mick Wragg, Lubrizol Corporation, Derbyshire, UK. Mr. Wragg has worked for Lubrizol Limited, a UK-based subsidiary of The Lubrizol Corporation, for 17 years in a regulatory capacity. For the majority of this time Mick has been part of Lubrizol’s corporate Product Safety & Compliance group and has held various technical and leadership roles, including as the corporate REACH leader through to the end of the first registration period. He then formed and led a new global Product Stewardship group and most recently Mick changed roles to be the Senior Global Product Steward for Lubrizol’s Industrial Additives business. Mick is a chemist by education and spent several years as a practicing toxicologist at a UK contract laboratory prior to joining Lubrizol. He also enjoyed a multi-year assignment working at Lubrizol’s corporate headquarters in Cleveland, Ohio. Mick has chaired the Health, Safety & Legislative subcommittee of the European Petroleum Additives Manufacturer’s Technical Committee (ATC) for several years, and currently participates on several European industry workgroups. He has also been a member of the UK Chemical Hazards Communication Society for his entire regulatory career. 

Mist - taught by Fred Passman, BCA, Inc. (10:15-11 a.m.)

This presentation covers the cause and impact of mists in a metalworking facility.  Real world techniques for managing mists and reducing their impact on the manufacturing environment are covered.

Health Effects of MWF Microbes - taught by Fred Passman, BCA, Inc. (11-12 p.m.)

Over the past decade our understanding of health risks associated with employee exposure to metalworking fluid microbes has increased substantially.  This module will provide insights into what we now know about diseases caused by metalworking microbes or biomolecules, and what remains theory and speculation.

GHS Overview: What's Changed? - taught by Neil Canter, Chemical Solutions (1-1:45 p.m.)

Discussion of Global Harmonized Standards will begin with an overview of GHS and its implications for companies in the MWF industry.  This module will set the stage for the topics to be covered through the rest of the course-day.  

Neil Canter received his PhD in Chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1983 and his BS in Chemistry in Brown University in 1978. He has been working in the metalworking fluid industry for over 25 years. Neil previously worked for Stepan Company and Mayco. Presently, Neil runs his own consulting company called Chemical Solutions. He specializes in commercial development, marketing, product development and regulatory support for the metalworking fluid industry. Neil is a member of the American Chemical Society, SAE and STLE. He is currently a contributing editor responsible for writing the monthly Tech Beat column in STLE's TLT magazine. Neil is a member of the STLE Board of Directors, STLE MWF Steering Committee, STLE MWF Ed & Training Subcommittee and STLE Education Committee. Neil has been actively involved in making presentation at past STLE Annual and Local Section Meetings and Education Courses over the past 20 years. 

SDS Overview: Appendix D - taught by Mick Wragg, The Lubrizol Corporation (1:45-2:15 p.m.)

Appendix D to the revised HCS provides a detailed outline of what information must be provided in each section of the new SDS.  This module will walk course participants through the Appendix D guidance. 

Label and SDS Pictograms: What Should My Customers Expect to See? - taught by John Howell, GHS Resources, Inc. (2:15-3 p.m.)

This module will explain the new family of pictograms that are mandated in 29CFR1910.1200 Appendix C.  These pictograms are to appear on product labels and SDS.  The new pictograms are linked to types of hazards and the level of danger posed by each hazard.

John K. Howell, Ph.D. has over forty-three years experience in metal finishing and metalworking technology and in safety, health and environmental affairs.  After over twenty-three years at Castrol Industrial North America and predecessor companies, and several years with D.A. Stuart and Primagy Consultants, John now is Vice President, GHS Resources, Inc., a company specializing in preparation of GHS-compliant SDSs for the lubricant and chemical specialties industries.

Classification of Mixtures - taught by John Howell, GHS Resources, Inc. (3:15-4:45 p.m.)

Perhaps the most challenging part of the SDS is Section 2 Hazard(s) Identification.  This two-module presentation will explain the classification guidance contained in 29CFR1910.1200 Appendices A and B so that by the end of this session, participants will have a good understanding of how mixtures of chemicals – such as MWF – receive their hazard classification. 

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Synthetics Lubricants 203: Non-Petroleum Fluids and Their Uses
Instructors: Michael T. Costello, Beth Winsett, Brian Jazdzewski, Sandra Walker, Gene Zehler, Thomas Blunt, W. David Phillips and Ken Hope

This course is designed primarily for formulators and users of lubricating materials. The course provides an overview of non-petroleum based lubricants, their comparison to each other and to petroleum oil. Each section covers the chemistry, strength and weaknesses of each material and basic application. The course begins at 8:30 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m, with lunch from 12-1:30 p.m., and breaks at 10 a.m. and 3:15 p.m.

Modules include: Introduction to Synthetic Fluids, Alkylated Aromatics, Polyglycols, Silicones, Esters, Fluorocarbons, Phosphates, and Polyalphaolefins.

Introduction to Synthetic Fluids - taught by Michael T. Costello, BASF (8:40-9:10 a.m.)

This presentation is an introduction and overview to the API Base-stock classification system and to the non-petroleum fluids currently in use in the lubrication industry worldwide.

Dr. Costello began his career in 1992 as a lubricant chemist at Witco Corporation, based at the Oakland Technical Center in New Jersey.  In 1996, he transferred to the Dublin, Ohio Technical Center as refrigeration oil group leader, where his group was responsible for developing new mineral oil based lubricants and conducting research in polyol ester based lubricants for use with new HFC refrigerants.  Dr. Costello then joined Infineum USA, L.P.  in their  Linden Technical Center in New Jersey as a principle investigator, where he helped launch the API GF-3 and GF-4 programs for passenger car motor oil in North America for key customers.  In 2002, he joined Chemtura Corporation as a Research Scientist and developed new products for the metalworking and industrial lubricant market.  Dr. Costello is currently the Global Technology Lead for Manual Transmission Fluids group for BASF Corporation in Tarrytown, NY developing transmission and axle lubricants for heavy duty trucks. A graduate of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry, Dr. Costello also holds a doctorate in inorganic chemistry from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana.  Dr. Costello is a member of the American Chemical Society (ACS),  American Society Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE).

Alkylated Aromatics - taught by Beth Winsett, ExxonMobil Chemical (9:10-10 a.m.)

This presentation will cover the chemistry, properties and applications for alkylbenzenes, alkylnapthalenes and other alkylated aromatics for in use in the lubricant area.

Beth is a Staff Chemist with the Synthetics Technology Division at ExxonMobil Chemical Company.  Her first 11 years in corporate research were focused on synthetic lubricants and related products. She is currently program leader for new product development and manufacturing support of Group V fluids.  She received a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and a Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry at Northwestern University.

Polyglycols - taught by Brian Jazdzewski, Dow Chemical Corporation (10:15-11:15 p.m.)

This presentation will briefly review the chemistry of PAGs, and emphasize the properties and applications of polyalkylene glycols in industrial lubrication.

Brian Jazdzewski is a Senior Research Scientist in the Polyglycols, Surfactants and Fluids business of the Dow Chemical Company, and is located in Freeport, TX.  He holds a Ph. D. in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of Minnesota and joined Dow Chemical in 2000.  He has worked in Dow’s Corporate R&D Function, as well as in the Dow Automotive and Polyglycols, Surfactants and Fluids businesses.  For the past 5 years, his research area of emphasis has been the use of Polyalkylene Glycol as base oils in formulations for Industrial and Automotive applications.

Silicones - taught by Sandra Walker, Dow Corning Corporation (11:15-12 p.m.)

The detailed chemistry, properties and formulation applications of silicone fluids will be described in this presentation.

Ms. Walker is an Application/Technical Service Engineer with Dow Corning Corp. based in Midland, MI.  She is a project leader and involved in product development and technical support for Molykote Lubricants.  Sandy has a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from the University of Kansas.  She is currently a senior at Saginaw Valley State University where she is acquiring your second degree in Chemistry. She has worked in Research and Development for 15 years; first developing automotive coatings and later developing solid lubricant technologies for industrial and automotive applications.

Esters - taught by Gene R. Zehler, Cognis Corporation (1:30-2:30 p.m.)

This presentation will review the chemistry, properties, and typical lubricant applications of organic ester basestocks. Various classes of organic esters will be discussed, including diesters, polyol esters, dimer esters, aromatic esters and monoesters.

Gene Zehler is a Technical Support Manager with the Fuel & Lubricant Solutions Division of BASF Corporation.  He has been developing and supporting synthetic lubricants since 1981.  Gene received his Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in Chemistry from the University of Cincinnati.  He is a member of STLE, NLGI, SAE, ACS and ASTM.

Fluorocarbons - taught by Thomas Blunt, Dupont Chemicals (2:30-3:15 p.m.)

This presentation will cover the chemistry, properties and applications for fluorocarbon fluids in use in the lubricant area.

Mr. Blunt joined DuPont recently and has a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. He has been involved in Research & Development and technical support for the lubricant industry for over 20 years, and he is currently responsible for technical service and product development for DuPont™ Krytox® performance lubricants.  Mr. Blunt is a member of the Society of Tribologists and Lubricating Engineers and the Society of Automotive Engineers.

Phosphates - taught by George Staniewski, Ontario Power Generation (3:30-4:15 p.m.)

This portion of the course will review the manufacture, chemistry and properties of the different phosphate ester types used as fire-resistant fluids and lubricants and as antiwear and extreme pressure additives for both mineral oil and synthetic basestocks.

George Staniewski has a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering and a Ph.D. in Tribology. For the last 28 years he has served as a Lubrication Engineer at Ontario Power Generation in Ontario, Canada. One of his main responsibilities includes monitoring the performance of electro-hydraulic control systems of steam turbines in which phosphate ester fluids are used. He has been involved in many root cause investigations of rapid fluid deterioration mechanisms, servo valves electro-kinetic erosion and filter plugging. He has published several papers related to impact of system design on fluid degradation rate, fluid performance characteristics over a long range and fluid purification treatments, including the use of ion exchange resins. He is a Professional Engineer in the Province of Ontario, and is a member of STLE and ASTM.

Polyalphaolefins - taught by Ken Hope, Chevron Phillips Chemical Company (4:15-5 p.m.)

This presentation will provide background on what Polyalphaolefins are with specific emphasis on their physical and chemical properties.  Comparisons of their properties versus other synthetics and mineral fluids will be covered.  Also, a brief review of the manufacturing process, market application, and a general supply/demand overview will be made.

Ken Hope graduated with a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1988. Ken has over 20 years of experience in the lubricant industry.  His research interests have been primarily focused in the area of polyalphaolefins and the use of synthetic lubricants.  He is a research fellow and team leader for NAO/PAO Technology at Chevron Phillips Chemical Co. LP. in Houston.  He is a member of the STLE Board of Directors, serves on the Finance Committee and chairs the Editorial and Publications Committee.  

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Advanced Lubrication 301
Instructors: Eugene Scanlon, Ramoun Mourhatch, and Michael Covitch

This course is intended for people who have either previously taken the STLE’s Basic Lubrication courses (101/102, or 103) and want to move on to a more advanced level, or for individuals who are already knowledgeable about the lubricants business, and want a more in-depth course on lubricant technology. A major emphasis is placed in this course on the concepts of oil rheology with discussions on how VI Improvers function and the low and high temperature properties of lubricants. The course will discuss wear, wear mechanisms, and how to diagnose wear problems from equipment failure. There will be a detailed discussion on the types of additives used in lubricants, the mechanism of how they work, and how they are formulated into additive packages. The course begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m, with lunch from 11:45-1:15 p.m., and breaks at 9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.

Modules include: Lubricant Additives, Wear and Wear Mechanisms, and Oil Rheology and Viscosity Modifiers.

Lubricant Additives - taught by Eugene (Gene) Scanlon, BASF (8:05-9:30 a.m.)

Dr. Scanlon’s presentation includes a discussion on lubricant additives’ chemistry and mechanism action; these additives include antioxidants, antiwear and extreme pressure agents, friction modifiers, viscosity index improvers, corrosion inhibitors, and metal deactivators. 

Eugene Scanlon is a Scientist at BASF in Tarrytown, NY.  He holds a PhD in Polymer Chemistry from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of Rhode Island. His experience at BASF includes the development of new antioxidants, anti-wear hydraulic fluid packages, viscosity index improvers and pour point depressants.  He is a member of ACS, STLE, SAE, and ASTM.

Wear and Wear Mechanisms - taught by Ramoun Mourhatch, Chevron Oronite Company, LLC (9:45-11:45 a.m.)

The presentation will include discussions on the various kinds of wear, wear mechanisms, and equipment failure modes.  There will be discussions on how to diagnose wear problems.  The course will emphasize the use of visuals to help in the understanding of wear.

Ramoun Mourhatch is the lead failure and wear analyst in Tribology and Fundamental Testing Team in Global Components at Chevron Oronite Company LLC. The Team is responsible for performance testing of lubricants and additives, innovations in test methods and equipment, and failure analyses of engine components. Ramoun has been a tribologist and active STLE member for 10 years. He holds a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Oil Rheology and Viscosity Modifiers - taught by Michael Covitch, The Lubrizol Corporation (1:15-2:30, and 3-5 p.m.)

Dr. Covitch will provide an overview of the low temperature properties of lubricants, lubricant viscosity theory; Viscosity Index Improvers (VI); low and high shear rate properties of lubricants and how these properties are measured.

Michael J. Covitch is a Senior Fellow at the Lubrizol Corporation in Wickliffe, Ohio. He holds a PhD in Macromolecular Science from Case Western Reserve University, a MS in Materials Science from the University of Rochester, and a BS degree in Chemical Engineering from Lehigh University. The current focus of his research is the development and technical support of viscosity modifiers and pour point depressants, although his experience at Lubrizol also includes studies of lubricant contamination and degradation during service, bench test development and rheological properties of complex fluids.  In addition to his technical expertise, Dr. Covitch spent two years on special assignment as a quality improvement specialist, helping to introduce quality management principles into the workplace. He is a member of SAE, and STLE and is Chairman of the SAE Engine Oil Viscosity Classification Task Force.

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Basic Lubrication 102: Basic Applications
Instructors: John Hermann, Chris Decker, Steve Lemberger, Rick Russo, Paul Shiller, and Sam Vallas

Basic Lubrication 102 is an overview of equipment systems (gears, bearings, seals, compressors and engines) and their lubrication requirements, including a module on grease. Like Basic Lubrication 101, this course does not require the student to have a formal scientific degree or background, although many technical terms and concepts related to the use of lubricants in various mechanical devices are covered. Basic Lubrication 102 is intended for a diverse group, including people involved in technical service, sales, marketing, manufacturing, maintenance and management who want to know more about how lubricants work in service. This course assumes fundamental knowledge of lubricants and lubrication principles, as presented in Basic Lubrication 101. The course begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 4:15 p.m, with lunch from 12-1 p.m., and breaks at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Modules include: Gears & Coupling Fundamentals, Grease Fundamentals, Seals, Compressors, Bearings & Lubrication Systems, ATF Fluids, and Basic Engine.

Gears & Coupling Fundamentals - taught by John Hermann, ExxonMobil (8-9 a.m.)

This module will cover gear geometry and typical gear properties that are common to both automotive and industrial gearing.  Typical gear lubricant viscosity and additives for various applications, industry gear tests and methods for applying the lubricant will also be discussed.

John Hermann is the Industrial Equipment Builder Manager for the Americas. John and his team secure and maintain equipment builder approvals and endorsements for Mobil lubricants and programs in the Americas. Prior to this position, John had served as the team lead of the Americas' Equipment Builder Engineer's group from July 1, 2006 until December 31, 2011. The Mobil Oil Corporation, now ExxonMobil Lubricants and Petroleum Specialties Company named John Hermann, Senior Equipment Builder Engineer July 1, 1998.  Prior to July 1, 1998, he was 27+ years with Texaco in a variety of sales, marketing, management and technical positions.  He has earned the designation STLE (Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers) CLSTM  (Certified Lubrication Specialist) and STLE Oil Monitoring Analyst (OMA-1). He was named a STLE Fellow in 1999.  In 2008, John was recognized with STLE's PM KU Meritorious Award.  John is currently a member of the STLE OMA Committee and at the STLE Annual Meeting teaches "Gears and Their Lubrication" at the STLE Annual Meeting Basic Lubrication Course. He is also a member of the STLE Presidential Council.  John has served in the following STLE positions: president, Chairman of the Education Committee, Chairman of the OMA Committee, Director, and Chairman of the Philadelphia Section. John has lectured on the fundamentals of lubrication, gear lubrication, hydraulic oils and turbine lubrication throughout the world at universities, professional societies and industry forums. 

Grease Fundamentals - taught by Chris Decker, ExxonMobil (9-10 a.m.)

For an overview of grease, this presentation will discuss grease terminology, composition and testing. Manufacturing methodologies and the benefits obtained from lubrication by grease shall be addressed as well.

Chris is Americas Grease Products Technical Advisor at ExxonMobil. He recevied a B.S. in Chemistry from Southeast Missouri State University. He's a member of the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE) and the National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI). He is an STLE Certified Lubrication Specialist (CLS), and has 15+ years with ExxonMobil including various positions within Manufacturing Operations, Quality Control, Field Engineering Services, and Product Technical Group. His hobbies and interests Include: camping, fishing, shooting sports and marksmanship.

Seals - taught by Steve Lemberger, Lemberger Consulting Services (10:15-11:15 a.m.)

Seals are what keep a lubricant in an application while minimizing environmental ingress.  This presentation will touch on the primary seal types, their composition, and function.  Proper seal installation, as well as selection criteria will also be discussed.

Steven Lemberger, CLS graduated with a BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois. After graduation, he joined Continental Can Company as a research engineer. From 1979-1999 he worked at John Crane Inc. (formerly known as Crane Packing Company) in different engineering capacities including senior design engineer. From 1999-2010 he was employed by American Electric Power D.C. Cook Nuclear Plant as a component and lubrication engineer. In 2010 he formed his consulting firm called Lemberger Consulting Services, LLC where he is the Technical Director. Mr. Lemberger has served as a Chairman of the STLE National Education Committee, and on the Board of Directors of STLE. He was the Chairman of the Seals Education Course and the Hydraulic Fluid Education Course. He is the founding member of the Certified Lubrication Specialists (CLS) Committee and he is a Certified Lubrication Specialist. In 2009 he received the P.M. Ku Award one of the highest award given out yearly by the National Executive Committee of STLE. The P.M. Ku award is given to a person to recognize his or her outstanding and selfless achivements and who worked tirelessly in the background for the benefit of the Society and devoting numerous hours to promote and advance the cause of STLE. He received two section awards of high honor bestowed upon him by the Chicago Section Executive Committee; the Allan A. Manteuffel Award and the Walter D. Hudson Award. Steve earned the Manteuffel Award in 1997 in recognition of his outstanding personal contribution to the field of lubrication engineering and to our technical Society. He also earned the Hudson Award in 2006 in recognition of his outstanding personal service to the section over a period of time   

Compressors - taught by Rick Russo, ExxonMobil (11:15-12 p.m.)

The presentation will focus on the fundamental of air compressors positive and non-positive displacement compressor and their lubrication requirements.

Rick Russo has been with ExxonMobil for over 24 years, serving as a Product Technical Advisor - Industrial, covering the Americas. He has a B.S. Chemistry from the University of Richmond in Virginia, and holds various industry certifications including STLE's CLS and OMA, as well as the ICML. Within ExxonMobil, he has previously served as Senior Lubrication Engineer, Industrial National Accounts Representative, Technical Support Manager U.S. Industrial, Chief Engineering Manager Industrial of both the Southeastern and Northeastern Districts, Territory Manager Industrial, Lubrication Engineer Industrial, and Sales Engineer Industrial. His previous experience includes serving in the U.S. Navy.

Bearings & Lubrication Systems - taught by Paul Shiller, University of Akron (1-2 p.m.)

Due to their availability and ease of installation and maintenance, ball or roller bearings are widely used in a broad variety of machines and equipment.  Consequently, design and maintenance personnel, as well as lubricant suppliers, are often confronted with need for some knowledge of their theory and application.  Accordingly, this presentation will include a review of the various types of rolling bearing and their salient characteristics, a very brief review of applicable theory, and then a discussion of practical application considerations with emphasis on lubrication.

Paul Shiller received a Ph.D. degree in Physical Chemistry from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH studying the surface reactions at fuel cell electrodes.  He holds an M.S degree in Chemical Engineering also from Case Western Reserve University where he studied the characteristics of “Diamond-like films” and an MS degree in Chemistry during which he studied the spectro-electrochemistry of surface reactions.  He received a BE degree in Chemical Engineering from Youngstown State University. He joined The Timken Company as a Product Development Specialist for lubricants and lubrication in 2004.  He moved to his current position as a Tribological Specialist with the Tribology Fundamentals group at the Timken Technology Center in North Canton in 2006.  Before coming to Timken he managed a polymer analytical chemistry lab at the Packard Electric division of DELPHI.  He started at Packard Electric as a quality control engineer in the ignition cable department when Packard Electric was a division of General Motors.  During his career he was also a Process Engineer for a thin film deposition process for liquid crystal display products at PanelVision in Pittsburgh, PA and a Research Engineer at The General Tire Company in Akron, OH studying polymer extrusion and molding and the effects of rubber formulation on the performance of tennis balls.  He started his lubrication career as a Summer Intern at The Penn State University.

ATF Fluids - taught by Sam Vallas, Chevron (2-3 p.m.)

The presentation will cover basic automatic transmission design and past through current OEM Fluid Specifications.

Sam Vallas, is currently a Training Specialist for Global Lubricants for the Southeast Business Area at Chevron Products Company. He is a member of STLE and holds STLE's CLS designation. He has previous experience as a NIASE Certified Automotive Technician for Buick and Chevrolet (4 years), Motor Vehicle Technician for US Army National Guard (6 years), and as a technician at Amoco’s Automotive Research Center developing and testing fuels and lubricants (15 years). During that time, he ran Amoco’s wind tunnel dynamometer facility, provided technical support for all racing programs including NASCAR, NHRA, and CART, and helped develop Amoco’s synthetic motor oils, diesel specific engine oils, and two cycle engine oils. He also has 20 years experience in lubrication marketing and tech service support for commercial and industrial lubricants in US and Caribbean. He lists motorcycle racing among his current hobbies. 

Basic Engine - taught by Sam Vallas, Chevron (3:15-4:15 p.m.)

The presentation will cover basic engine design and API /ILSAC Testing and certification. 

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Gears 101: Fundamentals of Gears
Instructors: Rick Russo, John Sewall, Kevin Harrington and Tom Schiff

This brand new course is designed to provide a general understanding of industrial gearing. It was prepared as a guide for the user to establish a base knowledge of gears, supporting components, lubricants, condition monitoring, wear modes and failure analysis methodology. The course begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m, with lunch from 12-1 p.m., and breaks at 10 a.m. and 2:45 p.m.

Modules include: Gear Functions, Gear Terminology, Action Between Gear Teeth, Gear Tooth Film Formation, Gear Manufacturing, Gear Boxes Supporting Components, Factors Effecting Lubrication, Lubricant Characteristics, Oil Requirements and Tests, Gear Wear Patterns, Failure Modes Effects Analysis, Gear Condition Monitoring, Gear Root Cause Failure Analysis, and a case study.

Gear Functions, Terminology, Action Between Gear Teeth, Gear Tooth Film Formation, and Gear Manufacturing - taught by Rick Russo, ExxonMobil (8-10 a.m.)

This first part of the module will describe the purpose(s) of gearing, provide an overview of the different types of gears, as well as explain the differences among gear types with respect to speed, load and thrust. Second, we'll go into gear tooth anatomy as well as critical gear tooth dimensions. Next we'll describe model sliding and rolling actions in/out of mesh, and allow you to describe the predominant action(s) between the different types of gear teeth. To cap off the presentation, we’ll discuss the development and impact of thrust. For the fourth segment, we'll cover the convergence zone and the forces that apply, how sliding and rolling impact oil movement, the three modes of lubrication, and where these modes appear during mesh by gear type. We'll end the presentation
by identifying metals typically used in the manufacture of gears including the cutting processes, heat treating, and other methods used to treat gearing.

Rick Russo, ExxonMobil Products and Technology, Fairfax, Virginia. Rick holds a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Richmond. He has been with ExxonMobil for more than 25 years and is currently the Product Technical Advisor – Industrial. He holds STLE’s Certified Lubrication Specialist (CLS) and Oil Monitoring Analyst (OMA) designations, as well as an ICML certification.  Before starting at ExxonMobil, he served in the Navy and has held various positions at ExxonMobil including: Senior Lubrication Engineer, Industrial National Accounts Representative, Technical Support Manager U.S. Industrial, Chief Engineering Manager Industrial, Territory Manager Industrial (South Carolina), Lubrication Engineer Industrial (New England), and Sales Engineer Industrial (Mid-Atlantic).

Gear Boxes Supporting Components, Factors Effecting Lubrication, and Lubricant Characteristics - taught by John Sewall, ExxonMobil (10:15-12 p.m.)

This first part of the module will cover the function and role of supporting components in a gear box, including: bearings, seals, breathers, oil filtration and cooling. Based on this information, we’ll cover how to choose components that best support gear box operation. The second presentation will provide important factors when selecting a gear lubricant, and allow you to distinguish between enclosed and open gear requirements. We'll end the presentation by covering the various gear lubricants, their varying physical qualities, as well as the additives that go into a gear oil, and the qualities they impart.

John O. Sewall, ExxonMobil Lubricants & Specialties Company, Fairfax, Virginia. Mr. Sewall received a B.S. in Marine Engineering & Operations  (1987) a Minor in Management and Naval Science from the Maine Maritime Academy located in Castine, Maine.  He also received his United States Coast Guard 3rd Assistant Engineers License of Steam and Diesel Marine Power Plants of any Horsepower U.S. or Foreign Flag Registry.  Upon Graduation, He received a commission in the United States Navy and attended The Navy Surface Warfare Officers School and the Navy Gas Turbine Engineering School (DD-963 Class Destroyer) located in Newport , RI.  After completion of training in Newport, he was assigned duties as the Main Propulsion Officer aboard the U.S.S. John Rodgers DD-983 from 1987-1991. Mr. Sewall joined ExxonMobil as a Sales Engineer responsible for sales and technical support based in Shreveport, LA.  In 1996 John was promoted to a Lubrication Engineers position based in Portland , Maine serving the Pulp &Paper Industry along with general mfg for the New England Territory.  John was promoted to Chief Engineering Manager for the NE Region responsible for managing ten lubrication engineers, customer service, and technical training for the North Eastern United States. He is a member of the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers, and has earned their Certified Lubrication Specialist designation.

Oil Requirements and Tests, and Gear Wear Patterns - taught by Kevin Harrington, ExxonMobil (1-2:45 p.m.)

This first half of the presentation covers test and performance specifications that apply to gear oils, the difference between the two, and will provide detail on a balanced formulation approach. The second half will cover a basic definition of wear and classifications, will allow you to identify the “Modes of Wear” per classification, and understand the miscellaneous causes of wear.

Kevin J. Harrington, ExxonMobil Products and Technology, Fairfax, Virginia. Mr. Harrington has bachelors and masters degrees in chemical engineering with over 25 years of lubrication-related experience. He currently manages technology programs the Mobil SHC™ portfolio of flagship industrial lubricants sold under the Mobil™ brand.  Kevin has held a wide range of technical and operations positions in development, manufacturing, and technical support of lubricants and lubricant additives.

Failure Modes Effects Analysis, Gear Condition Monitoring, Gear Root Cause Failure Analysis and Case Study - taught by Tom Schiff, ExxonMobil (3-5 p.m.)

In the first part of the module, we'll cover FMEA information including what it is, when it is used, and how it studies failures. Next, we'll go over basic condition monitoring concepts, including the importance of criticality, the diagnostic tools which make up a good “Gear Condition Monitoring” program, and identify gear contact patterns distinguishing between type and location that will play a role in the CM process. In the third part of the presentation, we'll provide an understanding of the RCFA process including collection and analysis of data as well as the solution(s) offered. It will also communicate the importance of empowerment and the need for direct line  reporting to the decision maker. We'll end the module with a case study to exemplify course concepts presented in previous modules.

Tom Schiff, ExxonMobil Lubricants & Specialties Company, Fairfax, Virginia. Tom started with Mobil oil in 1988 as an Industrial Sales Engineer then moved to a Lubrication Engineer. After 5 years, he moved to a Reliability Engineer then a Maintenance Superintendent in a Paper Company for 8 years. He rejoined ExxonMobil in 2000, as an Industrial Chief Engineer in the US then moved to the Americas Marine Field Engineering Support Manager then to the Global Marine Field Engineering Support Manager. From there, he was the Global Marine Products and Services Marketing Advisor and then for the last five years has been the Americas Field Engineering Support Manager.

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Synthetic Lubricants 204: Fluid Formulation & Applications
Chair: Beth Winsett, ExxonMobil Chemical Company

Instructors: Govind Khemchandani, Gene Finner, Michael T. Costello, Carl Ed Snyder, Jr.

This course provides and introduction to synthetic lubricant formulations and applications. It compares the use of these synthetic lubricants to petroleum based products and compares between types of synthetic lubricants. This course is a continuation from Synthetic Lubricants 203: Non-Petroleum Fluids and their Uses, however, attendance of 203 is not a pre-requisite. The course begins at 8:30 a.m. and concludes at 4:45 p.m, with lunch from 12-2 p.m., and breaks at 10:15 a.m. and 3:15 p.m.

Modules include: Synthetic Fluids for Heavy Duty Gas Turbines, Industrial Application / Compressors, Automotive Applications, and Military Applications for Synthetic Lubricants and Fluids.

Synthetic Fluids for Heavy Duty Gas Turbines - taught by Govind Khemchandani, The Dow Chemical Company (8:45-10:15 a.m.)

Synthetic Fluids occupy a major role in successful operation of heavy duty gas turbines used in power generation industry. Traditional petroleum based fluids are being replaced with synthetic fluids due to exceptional high performance requirements of these complex machines. Varnish build-up in today’s smaller, more powerful gas turbines is the root cause behind many turbine shutdowns and resulting lost power generation capacity. A small amount of varnish can cause servo valves to stick and the unit to automatically “trip” or shut down – an event that can cost as high as $150,000 or more for full load turbine trip. The role of synthetic lubricants thus has a decisive influence on the performance, efficiency, maintenance requirements and service life of these turbines. The course provides basic understanding of various types of turbines, compares different synthetic turbine oil formulations and their role in extending service life of gas turbines. 

Dr. Govind Khemchandani has over 20 years of experience with industrial and automotive lubricants and greases and has a Ph.D. in Chemical engineering from I. I. T Mumbai, India. Previously he held the Manager, Applied Research position for metal working additives, construction additives & Industrial Formulators with Evonik Goldschmidt Chemical Corporation. He was “Product Manager” in Pennzoil Quaker State Company, Houston, USA. At Pennzoil he developed automatic transmission fluids, various motor oils, gear oils, hydraulic oils and greases. As “Technical Services Manager” for Castrol, India Dr. Khemchandani was in charge of the R&D division and was instrumental in the transfer of technical know how from Castrol UK to Castrol India. At Castrol he developed Syntilo, Honilo brand metal working fluids and optimized Castrol industrial and automotive formulations. Currently he is the Senior Technical specialist for UCON Lubricants and Fluids with The Dow Chemical Company, a leading global manufacturer of PAG and PAG based hydraulic fluids and industrial specialties, at Freeport, Texas. He is a member of SAE, STLE, AIST, and NLGI. He has presented and conducted courses on Industrial and Automotive Lubricants in various industry organizations. He has published research papers in STLE, AIST, Technische Akademie Esslingen (TAE) & Fuel, London. Govind Khemchandani is an expert on application of PAG based synthetic fluids in power generation industry. He was the first to introduce non-varnishing PAG based turbine fluid in GE 7 FA heavy duty gas turbines.

Industrial Application / Compressors - taught by Gene Finner, Dow Corning Corporation (10:30-12 p.m.)

The presentation will cover various types of synthetic air compressor oil technologies and compare their advantages and disadvantages in air compressor applications. Compatibility, formulation, food-grade, key features and benefits plus general suggestions for lubrication best practices are covered.

Gene Finner has accumulated over 12 years of experience in the operation and lubrication of mechanical equipment in his role in Applied Engineering Technical Service for Dow Corning Corporation’s Molykote lubricants.  Gene’s job responsibilities include process & product optimization, troubleshooting and lubrication training along with North and South American lubricants product stewardship for Dow Corning.  Mr. Finner has made presentations on various lubrication topics at Noria’s Lubrication Excellence Conference, the annual conference meetings of STLE and NLGI among other organizations.  Specific to power generation & distribution he has given presentations and papers at IEEE, ASME, and FinePoint. He has been involved with Electric Power Research Institute since 2006 and contributes with regard to lubrication’s place in circuit breaker reliability.  Mr. Finner has given practical lubrication training to various public utility substation personnel at PG&E, Progress Energy, Duke Energy, National Grid, First Energy, Ameren and others. Gene earned a B.S. from the University of Michigan and is recognized by STLE as a Certified Lubrication Specialist.

Automotive Applications - taught by Michael T. Costello, BASF (2-3:15 p.m.)

This presentation will cover the use of synthetic lubricants in automotive applications.  Synthetic base-stocks, gasoline engine oils, diesel engine oils, gear/transmission lubricants and biodegradable transportation products will be discussed.

Dr. Costello began his career in 1992 as a lubricant chemist at Witco Corporation, based at the Oakland Technical Center in New Jersey.  In 1996, he transferred to the Dublin, Ohio Technical Center as refrigeration oil group leader, where his group was responsible for developing new mineral oil based lubricants and conducting research in polyol ester based lubricants for use with new HFC refrigerants.  Dr. Costello then joined Infineum USA, L.P.  in their  Linden Technical Center in New Jersey as a principle investigator, where he helped launch the API GF-3 and GF-4 programs for passenger car motor oil in North America for key customers.  In 2002, he joined Chemtura Corporation as a Research Scientist and developed new products for the metalworking and industrial lubricant market.  Dr. Costello is currently the Global Technology Lead for Manual Transmission Fluids group for BASF Corporation in Tarrytown, NY developing transmission and axle lubricants for heavy duty trucks. A graduate of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry, Dr. Costello also holds a doctorate in inorganic chemistry from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana.  Dr. Costello is a member of the American Chemical Society (ACS),  American Society Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE).

Military Applications for Synthetic Lubricants and Fluids - taught by Carl Ed Snyder, Jr., University of Dayton Research Institute (3:30-4:45 p.m.)

The various classes of synthetic lubricants used in military applications will be discussed.  Typical properties of each class will be presented as well as their advantages and disadvantages.  Emphasis will be placed on military aerospace applications.

Ed Snyder has over 48 years experience in the research, development and transition of advanced fluids and lubricants.  He received his B.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of Dayton and his M. Sc. in Physical Chemistry from the Ohio State University.  He was employed as a civilian scientist and materials engineer for the Air Force Materials Laboratory for 47 years and has been at the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) for approximately 1 ½ years.  His activities while at the Air Force resulted in a significant number of new and improved fluids, lubricants and related materials being transitioned to the Air Force as well as to the Navy and Army Aviation systems.  He continues his work at UDRI in new materials development and transition and solving field problems associated with fluids and lubricants.  He has most recently been involved in transitioning hydraulic fluid purification into the Air Force savings millions of dollars annually.  He has published over 125 technical papers and reports, has made over 130 invited technical presentations and has 15 patents. 

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Metalworking Fluids 130: Metal Treating, Cleaning & Protecting Fluids
Chairs: John Burke, Houghton International; and Brian Hovik, Boeing

Instructors: Scott Mackenzie, Neil Canter, Suresh Patel, Dave Morrison, E. Jon Schnellbacher, and Richard Butler

While processing parts using metalworking fluids there is a need for treating, cleaning and protecting chemicals and/or coatings. Substrates either are immersed in these chemicals or have them applied during some point of the processing. This course will cover heat treating including oil and polymer quenching, cleaning parts and protecting parts from rust and corrosion. You will learn the basics of metallurgy as it applies to heat treating and quenching. Cleaning will cover various types of surface contamination and technologies used to remove these contaminants. Metal protecting will cover wet applied chemistries, solvent and water based chemistries and dry film protective coatings. This course is intended for chemists, engineers, technical support staff, and field service technicians working with and using metalworking fluids. The course begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5:15 p.m, with lunch from 12:30-1:30 p.m., and breaks at 10:15 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Modules include: Metal Treating Fluids: Selection, Chemistry & Performance, Metal Treating Fluids: Maintenance & Control, Metal Cleaning Fluids: Chemistry, Metal Cleaning Fluid Applications I: Parts Cleaning Fundamentals, Metal Cleaning Fluid Applications II: Metalworking Fluid Sump/System Cleaning, Metal Protecting Fluids: Definition, Applications & Chemistry, Metal Protecting Fluids: Ingredients Used in Rust Preventatives and Testing, and Metal Protecting Fluids: Dry Films & Applications.

Metal Treating Fluids: Selection, Chemistry & Performance, and Maintenance & Control - taught by Scott Mackenzie, Houghton International (8:15-10:15 a.m.)

This module will focus on quench oils and how they are applied in practice.  Discussions of oxidation, and the mechanism of the oxidation of quench oil, as well as methods of mitigating the effect of oil oxidation will be covered.  The importance of agitation will be discussed, and methods of controlling distortion and residual stresses will be reviewed.

D. Scott MacKenzie, PhD, is a Fellow of ASM and Heat Treating Laboratory Manager at Houghton International.  He received his BS Metallurgical Engineering from The Ohio State University in 1981 and his PhD Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Missouri – Rolla School of Mining.  He worked for 18 years at McDonnell Douglas (later Boeing), first as a manufacturing engineer responsible for all heat treating activities in St. Louis, and later worked in the Failure Analysis Laboratory as lead engineer.  He was also an Associate Technical Fellow at Boeing, before coming to Houghton.  At Houghton, he is responsible for all heat treating technical activities.  He serves as the Corporate Metallurgist.

Metal Cleaning Fluids

Chemistry - taught by Neil Canter, Chemical Solutions (10:30-11:15 a.m.)

This module covers the basic types of metal cleaners with an emphasis on alkaline metal cleaners. As the first of three modules covering metal cleaners, a definition for a metal cleaner is provided along with the role of metal cleaners in the manufacturing process. The use of metal cleaners in a second application, the cleaning of metalworking fluid systems is also introduced. The main metal cleaner types are described by basestock along with their advantages and disadvantages. Key additive types used in alkaline metal cleaners are described along with reasons for why one type is no longer used and a second type is being phased out.

Neil Canter received his PhD in Chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1983 and his BS in Chemistry in Brown University in 1978. He has been working in the surfactant and metalworking fluid industries for over 25 years. Neil previously worked for Stepan Company and Mayco. Presently, Neil runs his own consulting company called Chemical Solutions. He specializes in commercial development, marketing, product development and regulatory support for the metalworking fluid industry. Neil is a member of the American Chemical Society, SAE and STLE. He is currently a contributing editor responsible for writing the monthly Tech Beat column in STLE's TLT magazine. Neil is a member of the STLE Board of Directors, STLE MWF Steering Committee, STLE MWF Ed & Training Subcommittee and STLE Education Committee. Neil has been actively involved in making presentation at past STLE Annual and Local Section Meetings and Education Courses over the past 20 years.

Applications I: Parts Cleaning Fundamentals - taught by Suresh Patel, Chemetall (11:15-12:30 p.m.)

To increase the effectiveness of the finish or final product/assembly, parts must be cleaned prior to the subsequent process(es). If the cleaner does not fulfill its purpose of removing unwanted soils from the substrate, subsequent processing steps will be impacted negatively e.g. not produce a uniform conversion coating, and therefore inadequately protect the metal surface from corrosion. A high-quality metal surface preparation (cleaning and rinsing) combined conversion coating and the appropriate organic coating is essential for the durability of finished products. Rinse water quality and proper rinsing are as critical, yet often-over-looked step in the metal preparation process. A well-designed, lean cleaning and rinsing process can help improve product quality, thru-put, and higher profits! This module will focus on different cleaning technologies (mechanical & chemical primarily) and issues specific to the parts cleaning industry. It will provide a foundation of critical terminology used to enable intelligent decisions in the selection, design, installation, and upgrade of a cleaning system. It will highlight topics including soils, substrates, cleaners, rinsing and drying, and the means to verify the cleaning and rinsing effectiveness. Process automation, safety, troubleshooting, and preventative maintenance of process equipment will also be covered. Key topics to be covered include: cleaning fundamentals and considerations, substrate, soil, cleaning mechanisms, types of cleaners and product selection, rinsing and drying, cleaning test methods, process equipment, maintenance, troubleshooting and safety.

Suresh Patel, Business Manager, General Industry with Chemetall US Inc.  He holds Masters Degree in Chemical Engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology and has been with Chemetall for 22 years.  He has held various positions at Chemetall throughout his career starting with lab Chemist, Process Engineer, Process Equipment Mfg. Manager, Marketing Manager and now Business Manager, General Industry - the largest and most successful business unit of Chemetall NAFTA. During his 22 years of service at Chemetall, he has been involved with large corporations like Caterpillar, CNH, and Cummins related to their approvals and processes. His expertise in the areas of Surface Treatment and non-Surface Treatment product lines and processes are well received by both internal and external customers. He has made numerous presentations to trade organizations and companies, including several Coating shows in Indianapolis and have written articles for several trade magazines. Suresh Patel has been awarded the "President Choice" award in 1998 and 2010, D.C Ball Award in 2010 and "Project Excellence" award in 1999 and 2001. Chemetall is serving the NAFTA as a specialty chemical manufacturer since 1909.  Headquartered in New Providence, NJ, Chemetall, the ISO 9001:2000 certified company offers a wide spectrum of specialty chemicals and systems to meet the needs of many industries and applications. Chemetall is a member of Chemetall GmbH, a renowned international corporation headquartered in Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

Applications II: Metalworking Fluid Sump/System Cleaning - taught by Dave Morrison, Castrol (1:30-2:15 p.m.)

Machine sump cleaning is an extremely important cleaning application that rarely gets the attention that it requires. The condition of a sump can make or break the fresh charge of a metalworking fluid and could cause a test failure before it even starts. However, due to customer constrains and many other issues a thorough cleaning is often not possible.  In this module you will learn the consequences of an improper sump cleaning as well as the benefits of one done properly. Additionally you will learn the steps of an ideal clean out procedure and the choices available to put together an abbreviated procedure when an ideal one is not feasible.

Dave Morrison is currently an HSSE Project Manager at Castrol Industrial North America, based in Naperville, IL, with over 30 years of experience in the field of Industrial lubricants and chemicals. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from Philadelphia University and a Masters in Business Administration from the University of Phoenix. Initially worked for 18 years in Technical Support covering all product categories with extensive customer interaction. During that time he also worked a stint in Research and Development formulating lubricants and cleaners for industrial customers. Since 2001 he has worked in the Health, Safety, Security & Environment Group. Responsibilities include compliance assurance with all legal and regulatory requirements as well as the company mandated Operational Management System. Additional support is provided to customers with HSE questions or issues regarding Castrol products or services.

Metal Protecting Fluids

Definition, Applications & Chemistry, and Ingredients Used in Rust Preventatives and Testing - taught by E. Jon Schnellbacher (2:15-3 p.m., and 3:15-4:15 p.m.)

Rust preventives & Metalworking fluids may be used as in-process & removable rust preventive coatings for metals. With some exceptions, these fluids fit into one of three categories: water soluble, emulsions, or oil/solvent soluble fluids.  Typically metalworking fluids deal primarily with iron, steel, and other ferrous substrates.  However, it is also common to see aluminum, copper, brass, and other non-ferrous metals. This course contains several sections. Metal Protecting I will discuss why metals corrode and the various chemistries and ingredients used in making ferrous and non-ferrous corrosion inhibitors for protecting metals.  Metal Protecting II will focus on the different categories of metal protecting fluids, how they are applied, and the applications for use.  Metal Protecting III introduces accelerated testing methods to determine the effectiveness of metal protecting fluids and the benefits and limitations in using these methods to predict real life results.

E Jon Schnellbacher has a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Eastern Michigan University, a MBA from the University of Toledo, and is a doctoral candidate studying Innovation and New Product Development at Lawrence Technological University.   He is also past chairman and a long-time member of the Detroit section of STLE.  Mr. Schnellbacher has spent 24 years as both a R&D chemist and manager in the chemical industry areas of: additives, metalworking fluids, coatings, rust preventives, and industrial cleaning compounds.  E Jon Schnellbacher is the technical director for Additives International - Lockhart Chemical in Flint MI.

Dry Films & Applications - taught by Richard Butler, Chemtool (4:15-4:45 p.m.)

Dry films can provide extremely good and long lasting protection.  This module covers both permanent and removable temporary coatings.  Types of coatings discussed will include: plasma treatment, superhydrophobic coatings, hard shell polymers (both clear and opaque, with discussion on polyurea, acrylics, and metallic pigments), phosphate-based (with discussion on ceramics, cementatious slurries, and sputter metallic – Co, Cu and Mn), and finish up with other miscellaneous coatings.

Richard Butler has been working in the industrial lubricants business for 33 years.  He is currently Technical Manager for Metal Working at Chemtool Incorporated.  He has worked primarily as a formulator of coolants and stamping lubricants throughout most of his career. Previously, he was an analytical chemist for Fuchs Lubricants.  Additionally, he held positions as a facility manger for North American Chemical Co. in Dallas and Newridge Chemical in Bedford Park, IL.  He has a B.S. in Chemistry from Michigan State and has served as president of the Chicago Section of the Society of Applied Spectroscopy, is a member of the Chicago Chromatography Discussion Group, and the old MCM-MSDG (Madison, Chicago, Milwaukee - Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group).  The father of three college students, he enjoys racing sailboats and bicycling.

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